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Community Resilience Reports

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Community Resilience Reports (Fall 2016)   The City Resilience Index (CRI) measures community resilience in four domains: health and well-being; economy and society; infrastructure and ecosystems; and governance and planning. Dickinson student researchers collected information about each of the four domains by interviewing 30 leaders from local government agencies, non-profit organizations, community development corporations and businesses, as well as by collecting and reviewing numerous public reports, websites and databases. The student researchers input the information they collected into the online CRI tool and generated a visual profile of community resilience in Carlisle. The four reports are below. Community Resilience – Economy & Society Community Resilience – Engagement & Wellbeing Community Resilience – Governance & Planning Community Resilience – Infrastructure and...

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Collected Stories

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The following are stories form the Greater Carlisle Area that have been collected as part of our Heart & Soul Project. This approach, aptly named Community Heart & Soul™, connects people with what they love most about their communities and translates those personal feelings into a blueprint for future decisions. A resident-driven approach to community planning and development, Heart & Soul focuses on building participation in local decision-making and empowering people to shape the future of their own communities. Rails to Trails, Run, Ride Ramble: April 17, 2016 One race participate explains the importance of recreation his community. http://greatercarlisleproject.dickinson.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/160417_011.mp3 A spectator at the race explains the importance of community events in her community. http://greatercarlisleproject.dickinson.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/160417_009.mp3 Neighbors Helping Neighbors: April 16, 2016 Hear what one community volunteer fears losing in his community, and his thoughts on getting younger generations connected to where they live. http://greatercarlisleproject.dickinson.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/160416_009.mp3 Listen to one community member talk about what she values about Carlisle, Pennsylvania. http://greatercarlisleproject.dickinson.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/ZOOM0007.mp3 Mount Holly Springs Marsh Preserve Clean Up: April 9, 2016 Mount Holly Springs Borough Council Member, Pam Still, interviewed volunteers about living, working and playing in Mount Holly and the importance of the Marsh Preserve. http://greatercarlisleproject.dickinson.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/160409_003.mp3 Black History Festival, Carlisle: February 27, 2016...

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Community Partnership Series

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Community Partnership Series   The Greater Carlisle Project’s Community Partnership Series was created to be a catalyst for community dialogue by aligning discussion topics with critical and timely issues identified by community members through the GCP’s Poverty Forum (spring 2015), Annual Fall Reception (fall 2015), and the Heart & Soul Project. Two forums are held in the fall and two in the spring, and efforts are made to align the topics we discuss with contemporary issues facing our community. All forums of the Partnership Series are free and open to the public.   Past Forums:   Friday, May 5, 2017 Community Resilience Workshop 8:00 – 10:00 am Dickinson College students, working in collaboration with the Greater Carlisle Project and the Borough of Carlisle, conducted research on measuring and increasing community resilience in Carlisle in fall 2016 as part of a course on Building Sustainable Communities. The research is being extended this semester by Dickinson students Max Lee, Matt Pasquali and Olivia Termini. Research findings, recommendations and next steps for measuring and increasing community resilience will be discussed at the workshop. If you are interested in attending the workshop, email Elizabeth Connelly connelle@dickinson.edu for more information by April 24.   Wednesday, April 26, 2017 Designing Systems Change Strategies to Address the Social Determinants of Health 9:00 am – 12:00 pm Co-sponsored with the Partnership for Better Health. This training is designed to help health and human service professionals, policymakers and funders better understand the potential roles of systems change strategies in improving the health of individuals and communities. The workshop will examine policies, practices and cross-sector partnerships designed to change a range of systems and have a positive impact on the social determinants of health. Case studies of communities that have addressed the social determinants of health, as well as interactive planning activities, will help attendees leave the workshop with actionable ideas and tools to bring back to their organizations. FREE ADMISSION.   Tuesday, November 3, 2016 Community Meeting November 3, 2016: Family Sustaining Wages. Held at the New Life Community Church, this forum featured a poverty simulation, panel discussion, and break-out conversations. Panel speakers included Kathy Lacomba, deputy director for Tri-County Community Action, Mark Price, labor economist for the Keystone Research Center, and Lucy Zander, executive...

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Increasing Resilience

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Increasing Resilience   The Greater Carlisle Project will develop recommendations for increasing community resilience, work with others to advocate for their implementation and help build the relationships and community cooperation that are essential characteristics of a resilient community. We already know some of the things that build resilience, and those that erode resilience, and these can help us get started. What builds resilience?  A sense of community, inclusion, belonging and trust Active public participation by all constituencies of our community Diverse and robust businesses, non-profits and public agencies Strong collaboration Good communication Effective leadership, planning and governance Investments in infrastructure, public facilities and institutions Protection of air, water, and green spaces What erodes resilience? Alienation, bias, discrimination and distrust Apathy, low participation Weak businesses, non-profits and public agencies Lack of collaboration Poor communication Poor leadership, planning and governance Lack of investments in infrastructure, public facilities, institutions Degraded air, water and land...

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Measuring Resilience

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Measuring Resilience   The Greater Carlisle Project and Borough of Carlisle partnered with Dickinson College to measure the resilience of our community. Sixteen Dickinson students conducted the research as part of a fall 2016 course, Building Sustainable Communities. The students and Carlisle were the first in the world to use the online City Resilience Index (CRI). The CRI is a framework and tool that was developed by Arup International through research with 26 cities around the world and is being used in the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities project. The CRI measures community resilience in four domains: health and well-being; economy and society; infrastructure and ecosystems; and governance and planning. The student researchers collected information about each of the four domains by interviewing 30 leaders from local government agencies, non-profit organizations, community development corporations and businesses, as well as by collecting and reviewing numerous public reports, websites and databases. The student researchers input the information they collected into the online CRI tool and generated a visual profile of community resilience in Carlisle.   The results of the fall research were presented at a December workshop that was attended by 35 members of the Carlisle community. Participants engaged in conversations facilitated by the students, giving feedback on the approach and findings of the research, sharing their own perspectives on resilience, and exploring possible next steps.   The work is continuing. Three students, Max Lee, Matt Pasquali and Olivia Termini, are doing further research in spring 2017 by convening focus groups to refine and improve measurements of community resilience and to develop recommendations for increasing community resilience. Their findings and recommendations will be presented at a Greater Carlisle Project community meeting in May 2017 (date, time and location to be determined). For more information about this project, contact Neil Leary (717-245-1954; learyn@dickinson.edu)....

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What is Community Resilience?

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What is Community Resilience? Community resilience is the capacity of a community to manage short and long term stresses and shocks so as to meet essential needs of all its members, particularly its most vulnerable members. Extreme weather events like hurricanes Katrina and Sandy, the economic recession, losses of major employers, civil disturbances, public health crises and increasing numbers of people struggling to find good jobs and access affordable health care, housing and food impact a community negatively and challenge its ability to function effectively. A resilient community is able to anticipate these and other events, plan for emergency and longer-term responses, implement responses effectively, cope with and recover from the impacts, and transform itself to thrive in new circumstances. It emerges from adversity as a vibrant, economically robust, socially just and sustainable community that works for all its members. Community resilience emerged as a concern during public conversations about updating Carlisle’s comprehensive plan. Are we as resilient as we can and need to be in Carlisle and nearby townships and boroughs? Can and should we work to deliberately increase resilience? Can this be done in ways that simultaneously serve other needs and priorities of our community? The Greater Carlisle Project, working in collaboration with the Borough of Carlisle and Dickinson College, initiated a project to measure community resilience in Carlisle as a first step toward building resilience in the...

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East Side Neighbors Association

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Meets on 2nd Wednesday of the month at 6pm. The mission of the East Side Neighbors Association is to address local concerns, to provide information, and to unite and improve our neighborhood with the assistance of the Carlisle Borough Police Department, Borough Council, and other Carlisle Borough departments.

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Thornwald Park

Thornwald Park

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Thornwald Park is a 32-acre park located in South Carlisle, on Walnut Bottom Road. The large Mansion sitting at its center, not officially a part of the park, was built in 1909, and today hosts a bed and breakfast. The park itself has large grass areas and pathways in between the trees. Carlisle residents come to Thornwald to enjoy a walk, have a picnic or simply to find some green spaces close to the city center. The park has a rich history dating back to the beginning of the 20th century. To find out more, check out the timeline and history of the park, which reveal the different uses of and debates about Thornwald Park and its Mansion over the years. Timeline | Thornwald Estate | Public Ownership| Debate over use | Converted mansion into retirement home | Dedication of Thornwald Park |The amphitheater | The land | Historical Resources   Material from: Students in History 211: American Landscapes. Dickinson College. Spring 2016....

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Memorial Park

Memorial Park

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Created in 1974, Memorial Park is a 2-acre park in Carlisle, Pennsylvania (149 West Penn Street) that offers both passive and active recreation sites.  It also is home to Hope Station, a community center that seeks to empower children to become active leaders. Memorial Park Home  |  History  |  Lincoln Cemetery  |  From Cemetery to Park |  Railroad Station  |  Community Voices   |   Cemeteries as Sites of Discrimination   | Photo Gallery |  Historical Resources   Material from: Students in History 211: American Landscapes. Dickinson College. Spring 2016....

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